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PTSD Treatment in Broward County: Inpatient Rehab

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Facing traumatic situations and overcoming them is often a challenge. In many cases, you might find yourself haunted by the past and, despite your best efforts, having trouble letting go of the memory. It could be something as simple as a car backfire that triggers these memories and emotions. You might find yourself exhausted because you live in a constant state of tension, worry, and feeling sick to your stomach. In other cases, it’s common for people to start withdrawing or isolating themselves from those that love and care about them. 

One thing that you should keep in mind is that recovery is a process. While one person may recover with a combination of medication and therapy in a few months, others might continue dealing with symptoms for years. Each person is different, and we all heal at our own pace, meaning you can’t feel frustrated by what seems like a lack of results. If you’re working on getting better, you are moving forward and not back, even though it may not feel that way at the moment. 

Fortunately, Broward County is an exceptional area to receive PTSD treatment. South Florida is notorious for operating the highest-quality treatment centers in the country. If you’re looking for PTSD treatment in Broward County, you should look for a facility that implements evidence-based therapies with substantial scientific evidence to treat symptoms. 

During a stint in an inpatient rehab center, a client will learn strategies, coping skills, and real-life tools that help them navigate through life after a traumatic incident. It will allow you to build resiliency, increase your self-efficacy, and move toward the quality of life you once enjoyed. 

Unfortunately, if you’re experiencing PTSD symptoms, you’re not alone. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is prevalent in our society. According to the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs, six out of 10 men and five out of every 10 women will experience at least one trauma in their lives. The findings also show that women are more likely to be the victims of sexual assault or child sexual abuse, while men are more likely to experience disasters, combat, physical assault, or witness severe injuries or fatalities. 

Unfortunately, if you’re experiencing PTSD symptoms, you’re not alone. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is prevalent in our society. According to the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs, six out of 10 men and five out of every 10 women will experience at least one trauma in their lives. The findings also show that women are more likely to be the victims of sexual assault or child sexual abuse, while men are more likely to experience disasters, combat, physical assault, or witness severe injuries or fatalities. 

An estimated 7% to 8% of the population will encounter PTSD at some point in their lives. If you are one of those people, it’s vital to understand how getting treatment can help and get your life back on track. Let’s delve into the symptoms of PTSD and get a better understanding of trauma.

What Is Trauma?

Psychological trauma is defined as an experience that affects us emotionally in a very significant way. Trauma is known to threaten the sense of normalcy in our world and the world around us. It’s damage to our minds caused by one or more events that lead to overwhelming stress, which exceeds our ability to integrate or cope with the emotions involved. This can lead to severe and long-term adverse consequences. 

Examples of psychological trauma include the following:

  • War
  • Childhood abuse
  • Interpersonal violence
  • Car accidents
  • Sexual assault
  • Sexual abuse
  • Racism
  • Natural disasters
  • Terrorist attacks
  • Homophobia
  • Tragic or sudden death of a close friend or family member

Encountering trauma is a part of our lives, and many people who reach out for treatment do so for many reasons. Whether they’re worried about a friend or loved one, or if it’s for themselves, it’s important to know that taking the first step to getting the help either you or someone else needs will pave the way for a less stressful life and positive future. Whatever leads you to these doors, team members are ready to help give you strength in courage as you look to achieve new goals.

What Is Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder? 

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can be a crippling condition that causes individuals to abandon their normal routine. It’s caused by a person witnessing, directly or indirectly, a life-threatening event. Experiencing PTSD symptoms after a traumatic event is common, but if the symptoms persist without any sign of slowing down, it’s possible the person has developed the mental health condition.

As was mentioned above, PTSD is not a weakness and can happen to anyone at any time. The most common signs of PTSD include the following:

  • Inability to remember details of the event(s)
  • Feel numb or detached from the world
  • Negative changes in your beliefs and thoughts (not trusting anyone)
  • Flashbacks, nightmares, or intrusive memories of the trauma
  • Loss of time or dissociation for hours or days at a time
  • Hypervigilant or easily startled
  • Avoidance of trauma that reminds you of the incident or memories
  • Physical reactions caused by reminders of the trauma, including sweating, racing heart, nausea, or vomiting 

If you’re experiencing any of these symptoms for a prolonged period, it’s vital to reach out to a medical professional for a diagnosis. They could recommend the following below.

Cognitive Processing Therapy

Trauma-focused psychotherapies are used on a broad scale to treat PTSD. An estimated 53 out of 100 people with PTSD who receive trauma-focused psychotherapy will no longer have the condition three months after therapy is initiated. On that same note, those 42 out of 100 people who rely solely on chemical relief and use medication without therapy will achieve remission. 

Cognitive processing therapy (CPT) is designed to treat the psychological impact of trauma, its behaviors, feelings, and thoughts that linger after the traumatic event. It’s considered a time-limited, short-term, evidence-based treatment for PTSD and other similar conditions. There are four major components involved that include:

  • Learning about CPT, PTSD, and trauma
  • Taking time to process the trauma
  • Learning how to challenge thoughts stemming from the trauma
  • Common trauma themes, including trust, safety, control, power, intimacy, and esteem

Those with PTSD will experience changes in their thoughts about themselves, others, and the world around them. During a CPT session at an inpatient facility in Broward County, therapists will look at how these traumatic events shifted thinking patterns and identify how these beliefs or thoughts are keeping you stuck. Unhelpful thoughts are referred to as stuck points in CPT. The typical protocol is to attend 12 sessions that are delivered over six to 24 therapy sessions. 

What to Expect from Trauma Therapy?

The first step in this process is to reach out for help and meet with a therapist for an onboarding session. The trauma specialist will ask questions to get a thorough understanding of your background and what brought you in to see what you want to accomplish. 

Trauma therapy is hands-on, meaning you focus on learning how to:

  • Decrease physiological arousal
  • Relax your body, and 
  • Identify triggers
ptsd-treatment-in-broward-county

Some sessions will involve talking about or visualizing the event, while others will involve more talking. 

It’s common for your symptoms to increase in intensity before they get better, but keep in mind that you’ll have the support of a therapist for the duration of your treatment. Keep in mind, the emotional discomfort and stress are temporary. Even though it doesn’t feel like it, there is a light at the end of the tunnel when you choose to get help. Clients report that the benefits of therapy outweigh the initial discomfort they experience during the process. 

Treating trauma symptoms and PTSD usually includes other team members, when appropriate. It’s possible your therapist will suggest visiting a psychiatrist, general physician, and dietitian during the course of treatment to address all facets of your body and mind. An all-encompassing approach will be the best way to overcome this challenge in your life. Remember, with the right help, you can overcome this terrible affliction. With time and support, anything is possible. Make sure to reach out for help today.

Sources

NIC (April 2021) Evidence-Based Practices (EBP). from https://nicic.gov/evidence-based-practices-ebp

U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs (April 2021) PTSD. from https://www.ptsd.va.gov/understand/common/common_adults.asp

U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs (April 2021) Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT). from https://www.ptsd.va.gov/understand_tx/cognitive_processing.asp

NIMH (April 2021) Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. from https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/post-traumatic-stress-disorder-ptsd/index.shtml

NCBI (June 2019) Trauma and Public Mental Health. from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6603306/

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